Tag Archives: south korea

Reading List Education Market Overview South Korea EDUKWEST

Reading List: Education Market Overview South Korea

South Korea’s education system has been the envy of many western governments. The country managed to transform itself from mass illiteracy to global economic powerhouse in less than two generations. Its students consistently rank in the top 5 for PISA test results, and the country has a 93% high school graduation rate. 82% of these graduates go on to university.

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korea private tutoring

A Tale of two Koreas: North and South crack down on Private Tutoring

I briefly mentioned the two stories at the beginning of our Sunday Review yesterday. But as South Korea’s education system is often hailed as one of the best in the world and we still know so little about North Korea I wanted to make sure that you don’t miss out on them.

I find it quite fascinating that two states that are politically so totally opposed to one another came to the same conclusions regarding their education systems as both governments feel that private education is deteriorating the public education system.

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EDUKWEST Sunday Review

Sunday Review for the Week of February 17th 2014

In this week’s Sunday Review we have gathered more interesting stories, research and opinions from around the world.

For example both North and South Korea crack down on private education, the consequences of Net Neutrality on Obama’s ConnectEd program, why basic education software should be free to use and how a 20 minute walk to school or work can help us to perform better throughout the day.

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ENT Audio Podcast

Ed News Ticker #3 for April 20th 2012 (Audio)

ENT Audio Podcast

Ed News Ticker #3

  • recorded: April 20th 2012
Subscribe to ENT Subscribe to ENT Audio via RSS Subscribe to ENT Audio via iTunes
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The quest for better batteries and solar power

Panasonic reports that it will be using solar powered batteries to broadcast a full solar eclipse on May 20th from the summit of Mt Fuji – Well worth checking out the webcast with your students, but more importantly, signs of innovation in the battery and alternative power space.

Source: The Verge


Treehouse raises $4.75 million

Web design and development community Treehouse has just secured $4.75 million in funding from Chamath Palihapitiya’s Social+Capital partnership and the Greylock Discovery fund. The platform uses example videos, online quizzes and badges to teach people how to develop websites, web apps, iPhone apps and launch startups.

Source: TechCrunch


South Korea putting the brakes on digital textbooks

The South Korean government has backed off the plan to switch first- and second-grade classrooms to electronic readers. Older students will make the switch, but they’ll still have access to regular books as well. Whereas there aren’t yet studies about the impact of so much screen time on brain development, there are studies that show that college students who were forced to go without media for 24 hours can experience symptoms similar to drug withdrawal.

Source: Good


Missouri closes six charter schools

Missouri’s Board of Education has decided to close six charter school campuses run by the Virginia-based Imagine Schools Inc., saying that it “would be a disservice” to children to keep them open because of academic and fiscal issues.
The decision to close the schools at the end of the school year will mean that about 4,000 students will have to find a new school for next fall. A transition office is being set up to help families find new school placements.

Source: Washington Post


New Reading Tests for elementary school teachers

Wisconsin became the latest state to adopt a rigorous, stand-alone test of elementary teachers’ knowledge of the science of reading. Though such efforts to improve the quality of reading instruction generally have been pushed by a fairly small network of constituents, those proponents say that updating licensing exams is one of the few ways states can ensure that reading-instruction skills are taught in teacher training.

Source: Education Week


NYC Hispanic and Black kids highly disadvantaged

The New York City public school system is a “rotting apple” that is failing Latino and black students, says a new report by the Massachusetts-based Schott Foundation for Public Education. These strong words come as Mayor Michael Bloomberg has tried to make education a priority. New York University education professor Pedro Noguera wrote the study’s foreword and said the disparities are “tantamount to apartheid-like separations.”
The foundation concluded black or Hispanic students are four times as likely as Asian or white students to be enrolled in one of the city’s lowest-performing high schools. Students from low-income families also have little chance of being tested for gifted and talented programs.

Source: Latino Ed Beat


High school students launch rubber chicken into space

High school students from Bishop, CA, launched a rubber chicken (NASA’s mascot for their Solar Dynamics Observatory) into space aboard a helium balloon last month (along with a lunchbox full of instrumentation, insects, and sunflower seeds) with help from a local 5th grade class to study the effects of the recent solar storm. The chicken reached a final elevation of 119k feet and cleared 99% of the atmosphere. Later this year, the group will be sending microbes in a similar vehicle “ to see ‘if they can live at the edge of space.’”

Source: The Verge


$4.2 million settlement for student paralyzed by bully

Six years after receiving a punch from a bully that left Sawyer Rosenstein paralyzed, the New Jersey school board in the district where he was a student has agreed to a $4.2 million settlement. Rosenstein was paralyzed from the waist down due to a clot that had formed after the blow in a major artery above his abdomen. When the clot moved down to his spine, it burst, leaving him paralyzed.

Source: MSNBC


PISA and environment

According to the latest issue of PISA in Focus, students who have high levels of environmental literacy are still the minority; but all students get most of their information about environmental issues at school.

Results from the PISA 2006 survey, which focused on science, indicate that an average of 19% of 15-year-olds across OECD countries perform at the highest level of proficiency in environmental science. This means that they can consistently identify, explain and apply scientific knowledge related to a variety of environmental topics. At the other end of the spectrum, an average of 16% of students perform below the baseline level of proficiency, meaning that they cannot answer questions containing scientific information related to basic environmental phenomena or issues. In four OECD countries, 20% or more of students score below this baseline level.

Source: OECD


Drink water and you’ll perform better

Controlling for ability from previous coursework results, researchers found those with water scored an average of 5% higher than those without. The study, from the universities of East London and Westminster, also noted that older students were more likely to bring in water to exam halls. It says the findings have implications for exam policies on access to drinks.

Source: BBC

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ENT - The Ed News Ticker

Ed News Ticker #3 for April 20th 2012

ENT - The Ed News Ticker

Subscribe to ENT Subscribe to ENT Video via RSS Subscribe to ENT Audio via RSS
Subscribe to ENT Audio via iTunes
Download Episode Download Episode Video Download Episode Audio

The quest for better batteries and solar power

Panasonic reports that it will be using solar powered batteries to broadcast a full solar eclipse on May 20th from the summit of Mt Fuji – Well worth checking out the webcast with your students, but more importantly, signs of innovation in the battery and alternative power space.

Source: The Verge


Treehouse raises $4.75 million

Web design and development community Treehouse has just secured $4.75 million in funding from Chamath Palihapitiya’s Social+Capital partnership and the Greylock Discovery fund. The platform uses example videos, online quizzes and badges to teach people how to develop websites, web apps, iPhone apps and launch startups.

Source: TechCrunch


South Korea putting the brakes on digital textbooks

The South Korean government has backed off the plan to switch first- and second-grade classrooms to electronic readers. Older students will make the switch, but they’ll still have access to regular books as well. Whereas there aren’t yet studies about the impact of so much screen time on brain development, there are studies that show that college students who were forced to go without media for 24 hours can experience symptoms similar to drug withdrawal.

Source: Good


Missouri closes six charter schools

Missouri’s Board of Education has decided to close six charter school campuses run by the Virginia-based Imagine Schools Inc., saying that it “would be a disservice” to children to keep them open because of academic and fiscal issues.
The decision to close the schools at the end of the school year will mean that about 4,000 students will have to find a new school for next fall. A transition office is being set up to help families find new school placements.

Source: Washington Post


New Reading Tests for elementary school teachers

Wisconsin became the latest state to adopt a rigorous, stand-alone test of elementary teachers’ knowledge of the science of reading. Though such efforts to improve the quality of reading instruction generally have been pushed by a fairly small network of constituents, those proponents say that updating licensing exams is one of the few ways states can ensure that reading-instruction skills are taught in teacher training.

Source: Education Week


NYC Hispanic and Black kids highly disadvantaged

The New York City public school system is a “rotting apple” that is failing Latino and black students, says a new report by the Massachusetts-based Schott Foundation for Public Education. These strong words come as Mayor Michael Bloomberg has tried to make education a priority. New York University education professor Pedro Noguera wrote the study’s foreword and said the disparities are “tantamount to apartheid-like separations.”
The foundation concluded black or Hispanic students are four times as likely as Asian or white students to be enrolled in one of the city’s lowest-performing high schools. Students from low-income families also have little chance of being tested for gifted and talented programs.

Source: Latino Ed Beat


High school students launch rubber chicken into space

High school students from Bishop, CA, launched a rubber chicken (NASA’s mascot for their Solar Dynamics Observatory) into space aboard a helium balloon last month (along with a lunchbox full of instrumentation, insects, and sunflower seeds) with help from a local 5th grade class to study the effects of the recent solar storm. The chicken reached a final elevation of 119k feet and cleared 99% of the atmosphere. Later this year, the group will be sending microbes in a similar vehicle “ to see ‘if they can live at the edge of space.’”

Source: The Verge


$4.2 million settlement for student paralyzed by bully

Six years after receiving a punch from a bully that left Sawyer Rosenstein paralyzed, the New Jersey school board in the district where he was a student has agreed to a $4.2 million settlement. Rosenstein was paralyzed from the waist down due to a clot that had formed after the blow in a major artery above his abdomen. When the clot moved down to his spine, it burst, leaving him paralyzed.

Source: MSNBC


PISA and environment

According to the latest issue of PISA in Focus, students who have high levels of environmental literacy are still the minority; but all students get most of their information about environmental issues at school.

Results from the PISA 2006 survey, which focused on science, indicate that an average of 19% of 15-year-olds across OECD countries perform at the highest level of proficiency in environmental science. This means that they can consistently identify, explain and apply scientific knowledge related to a variety of environmental topics. At the other end of the spectrum, an average of 16% of students perform below the baseline level of proficiency, meaning that they cannot answer questions containing scientific information related to basic environmental phenomena or issues. In four OECD countries, 20% or more of students score below this baseline level.

Source: OECD


Drink water and you’ll perform better

Controlling for ability from previous coursework results, researchers found those with water scored an average of 5% higher than those without. The study, from the universities of East London and Westminster, also noted that older students were more likely to bring in water to exam halls. It says the findings have implications for exam policies on access to drinks.

Source: BBC

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