Tag Archives: mlearning

busuu

busuu shows that Mobile Learners really exist

busuu

This week busuu made the news having achieved 20 million downloads. And while this surely is a nice number we all (should) know that vanity numbers alone don’t say anything about your business. Just ask Livemocha. Luckily busuu has more to offer than the glitzy baits that get you on TechCrunch.

If you look deeper into the press release you should notice something that is far more interesting.

The general shift to mobile learning is further demonstrated by the fact that busuu users now complete 33% more exercises via the app than online.

There has been written a lot about learning sprints and mobile learners but having hard data to prove that people are actually learning and completing tasks on their mobile devices is pretty fascinating.

If you take the time and look at people during their commute in public transport you will notice that over the years the number of people looking down on a smartphone of some sort has risen dramatically. It has become a somewhat personal zone of privacy in an increasingly noisy and hectic environment. And this is what makes it perfect for learning sprints.

You know exactly how much time you’ll have to spend and frankly, there is nothing much you could do otherwise. I mean talking to people? Come on. Hence people either check their email; social media or catch up with the latest news. And while some people add a round of Words with Friends (is this still a thing?) or any other popular mobile game, some actually use this time bubble to learn a language.

It really is a perfect learning environment. Nothing that may distract you and a fixed amount of time to complete a task. When you are doing the same thing at home in front of your computer, a lot can and will happen to interrupt the learning from spouses to children and pets. But don’t write off learning on a computer just yet.

I asked busuu’s co-founder and CEO Bernhard Niesner whether there was a difference in the time people spend learning on mobile devices compared to computers and he told me that the session time on a computer is twice as high than on mobile devices. On the other hand, busuu now has more users that learn with its mobile products.

Learners now can also further personalize their learning experience by setting their own goals. Niesner told me that for now most users choose the beginner levels which might indicate that people find language learning more entertaining when they are not drilled too hard.

This of course leads to the inevitable question of how serious most people are about learning a foreign language and what most learners feel is good enough, but I guess this has always been the case. For the vast majority language learning was a tedious task. Now startups like bussu, babbel.com, MindSnacks and others turned the basics into an enjoyable, game like experience.

More serious learners will always go deeper and probably prefer learning on a computer where it is easier to type, interact with more complex tasks or set up a video call with a language partner. Mobile learning is an essential part of the overall process, it can be an “entry drug” but for now it won’t replace the web based experience.

Babbel playsay

babbel.com enters US Market through Acquisition of PlaySay

Babbel playsay

Now that is indeed something that does not happen everyday. A German startup acquires an US based startup for parts, in this case language learning startup babbel.com from Berlin the user base of San Francisco based PlaySay which is pretty telling as neither the PlaySay team nor the technology will be integrated into babbel.com products. Only PlaySay’s founder Ryan Meinzer, whom I interviewed in October 2011, is going to join babbel.com in the role of an advisor for the US market.

So let’s break this one down. PlaySay started at TechCrunch Disrupt as a Facebook application for learning Spanish, and eventually pivoted its way to a mobile application to learn Spanish. It even ranked #1 in the education category of the iTunes Store in ten different countries including the US at one point.

But babbel.com does not seem to be interested in the technology or applications but merely in the PlaySay users who now have 45 days to switch over to using babbel.com instead.

babbel.com is part of a group of three language learning startups which all emerged at about the same time and have battled to become the next Rosetta Stone. Besides babbel.com the others are Livemocha out of Seattle and busuu who just relocated their HQ from Madrid to London after raising a Series A round.

While Livemocha and busuu chose and continue to rely on a freemium model as their business strategy, babbel.com decided to switch to a premium model rather early on. Whereas this might have contributed to slowing down the startup’s growth in terms of users compared to Livemocha and busuu, it has certainly helped substantially in terms of revenue generation and breaking even.

Similar to busuu, babbel.com did not take on tons of funding at this point which probably helped the team a lot to figure out the business model and how to sell best. A strong factor in the growth of both busuu and babbel.com have been the respective mobile applications. In fact, babbel.com’s first acquisition was the mobile app developing startup that had built the first babbel.com applications.

The only real problem babbel.com seems to have had is growing its footprint and finding success in new territories. Both Livemocha and busuu succeeded early on to grab market share in key markets like the US and South America.

Taking all this into consideration I suppose that babbel.com got PlaySay for a pretty reasonable price as the press release states

Deal fueled from operative cash flow.

PlaySay have only raised $820k since 2008 which means that even if babbel.com paid a bit more, like in the range of $1.5m to $2m it was still kind of cheap. It also shows that PlaySay did not manage to get enough traction to make it worthwhile for the founder and his team to keep on working on the product or to raise another round of funding. I think the following sentence from the press release why PlaySay sold to babbel.com is pretty telling.

“It’s fun, social and mobile, just like PlaySay…only better!”

I don’t know how many users PlaySay actually has in its database but if we assume that 1 million people have downloaded the application or signed up for the Facebook application at one point, babbel.com may have paid about $2 per user. I am also not sure what the cost per acquisition for a language learner is these days but I guess it’s much higher, maybe in the $10 range.

Of course, babbel.com can’t be sure that all of the PlaySay users will happily switch to the new service and then also pay for it but in the end it might be enough to get the babbel.com Spanish app ranking in the US iTunes Store which will eventually lead to better exposure and new users.

MindSnacks

Kick off The Year of the Dragon with MindSnacks Mandarin

MindSnacks

2011 was a banner year for San Francisco-based mobile learning startup and EDUKWEST favorite, MindSnacks. Among many exciting accomplishments, their addictive language learning applications were named among the best iPhone education apps of the year in Apple’s App Store Rewind. I recently paid the company’s studio a visit, as I was eager to find out what MindSnacks has in store for 2012.

MindSnacks MandarinJust in time for the Chinese Year of the Dragon (4710, beginning on January 23, 2012), the latest release from MindSnacks teaches over 1400 words and phrases in Mandarin Chinese, including greetings, numbers, and days of the week. The app has 50 levels of content, and is appropriate for a wide range of language learners, from novice to intermediate. If you are less familiar with Chinese characters, you can start in pinyin (phonetic) mode – which is very helpful to learn basic pronunciation. For those of you practicing your reading skills (like myself, a somewhat lapsed native Mandarin speaker), the six mini games can also display simplified characters.

Mandarin was the first language tackled by MindSnacks that did not use the Roman alphabet (other apps available include Spanish, French, Italian, Portuguese, German, and ESL – available for seven languages). Another characteristic of Mandarin that makes it particularly challenging for second language learners is that it is tonal. In a tonal language (other examples include Thai and Vietnamese), syllables with the exact same pronunciation (e.g., ma) may have entirely different meanings based on their pitch. In Mandarin Chinese, there are four tones (as well as “neutral”). In order to address this fundamental aspect of Mandarin language learning, the MindSnacks team did extensive research in the development of their new gesture based mini game, Galactic, as detailed on their official blog. I won’t go into much detail here, as the company has already described their process eloquently. I highly recommend reading their post!

MindSnacks Mandarin Game
Galactic Game

I agree that a gesture-based game is ideal for learning tones, as these exact gestures have been familiar to me throughout my schooling in Mandarin Chinese from childhood throughout my university years. As I discussed with co-founder and CEO Jesse Pickard, gesture has been shown to enhance word and concept learning in general. Moreover, I can attest anecdotally that I rely on gesture when trying to remember how to write a Chinese character (and have also seen others do the same), which also supports the idea that learning and memory of Mandarin also has a spatial component. From a developer’s standpoint, I think that Galactic truly takes advantage of the touchscreen in a unique game mechanic. The space theme is also visually and auditorily appealing, creating an all around fun (and educational!) multisensory experience.

From a learning science perspective, I appreciate that fundamentals of memory are taken into account in the development of all of MindSnacks apps. As you advance through the levels, you may notice that words and phrases from previous lessons reappear throughout the game. This concept is referred to as “spacing” or “spaced testing” in the memory literature, which has been consistently shown to aid long-term retention of new words and concepts.

All in all, I think that 2012 has a lot of great things in store for MindSnacks. The company looks forward to introducing apps in exciting new content areas, as well as adding more social features to their games. I will also be returning to the MindSnacks studio in the not-too-distant future to give EDUKWEST readers a tour and a chance to meet the team in a sneak peek into life at a startup.

Keep up with MindSnacks on the web, Facebook, and Twitter, and if you haven’t already, check out Mandarin and all of their language apps, available free on the App Store for your iOS device!

review:ed Audio Podcast

review:ed #9 with Christopher Dawson of ZDNet [Audio]

review:ed Audio Podcast

review:ed Episode #9

  • recorded: December 30th 2011
  • Guest: Christopher Dawson, Contributing Editor ZDNet
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Show Notes

  • [02:00] How did the economy influence education in 2011
  • [05:00] Open Educational Resources & SOPA
  • [08:37] Implementing Tech in the Classroom
  • [13:00] Moodle and other LMSs
  • [17:49] Why Android did not take off in 2011
  • [21:48] Microsoft Windows Phone 7
  • [25:18] Tablets
  • [33:50] Bring your own Device
  • [38:00] Textbook Rentals / E-Textbooks
  • [41:40] Pearson
  • [47:25] Virtual Classrooms
  • [52:27] Facebook
  • [55:57] Text Messages in the Classroom
  • [58:15] Khan Academy
  • [01:01:10] Mobile Learning
  • [01:06:56] 21st Century Skills
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reviewed 09 christopher dawson zdnet pic

review:ed #9 with Christopher Dawson of ZDNet

Christopher Dawson ZDNet
Christopher Dawson ZDNet

For this last episode of review:ed in 2011 I invited Christopher Dawson, contributing editor at ZDNet and Vice President of Business Development at WizIQ. Chris has a long track record in education and is one of my favorite education / technology bloggers out there. Hence it was great to have him for a review of the big stories in 2011 and also for an outlook on the coming year.

Subscribe to review:ed Subscribe to review:ed Video via RSS Subscribe to review:ed Audio via RSS
Subscribe to review:ed Audio via iTunes
Download Episode Download Episode Video Download Episode Audio

Show Notes

  • [02:00] How did the economy influence education in 2011
  • [05:00] Open Educational Resources & SOPA
  • [08:37] Implementing Tech in the Classroom
  • [13:00] Moodle and other LMSs
  • [17:49] Why Android did not take off in 2011
  • [21:48] Microsoft Windows Phone 7
  • [25:18] Tablets
  • [33:50] Bring your own Device
  • [38:00] Textbook Rentals / E-Textbooks
  • [41:40] Pearson
  • [47:25] Virtual Classrooms
  • [52:27] Facebook
  • [55:57] Text Messages in the Classroom
  • [58:15] Khan Academy
  • [01:01:10] Mobile Learning
  • [01:06:56] 21st Century Skills
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logo-yongopal-app

YongoPal hits the iTunes App Store – Let the Culture Sharing Begin

YongoPal, a startup I have had the chance to accompany from very early on, launched in the iTunes App Store yesterday. If you followed the startup’s history at KirstenWinkler.com and here on EDUKWEST you know that this is just the latest incarnation of YongoPal and quite at the other end of where it all had started.

The YongoPal app is about exploring different cultures through photos and short messages. Two people are matched based upon age and interests and then share pictures and messages for one week, opening a window in each others culture. As Darien told me in an email today

It is pretty obvious that the new YongoPal doesn’t really have a direct educational imperative.

As I had the chance to test the app during its closed beta I also asked him about the feedback of the other testers involved. Darien stated that the reactions were mixed for reasons the team was aware of.

As you yourself experienced, the onboarding process is slow and is missing an important element of instant gratification — which is absolutely critical in the mobile space.
For people who made it through the slow onboarding process and who found themselves in interactions with new people in a different part of the world, the experience has been universally gratifying. This has even been true for people who initially declared themselves “not our target market” but who volunteered to test for us out of professional courtesy or personal friendship.

The team is of course working to streamline the process but it was important to test this new iteration of the platform and receive user feedback and not build something based on personal hunches.

The trickiest part for the YongoPal team was to learn how to actually create a mobile application on the fly.

This was the first mobile application that Daron had ever designed and only the second iOS app that Jiho had ever coded.  When you’re looking at our product by the chronological order of when different components were designed and built, you realize what a big difference just two months of learning make.

During the first day that the app is live in the iTunes App Store it already attracted users from 13 countries around the globe, namely the US, Canada, Mexico, China, Japan, Korea, Singapore, Hong Kong, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, England, Germany and Switzerland and the majority of them were not beta testers.

 

Website: YongoPal.com
Twitter: @YongoPal

iTunes: YongoPal 

innov8

Have an idea for a Learning Application? Pearson is interested.

There are still two days to register for the Pearson innov8 competition. If you are a teacher, student or app developer with a great idea for an application that makes learning better, Pearson is not only interested in learning more about it.

Five entrants will win  £1,000 each and get the opportunity to work on their pitch with the innov8 panel, a group of young people, educationalists and innovators.

The votes of the panel, innov8 website visitors and people who vote at the Pearson stand at BETT 2012 are going to choose the winner who then is going to receive an additional £5,000 and the opportunity to work together with the Pearson team to turn the idea into reality.

 

Website: innov8.pearson.com
Twitter: @PearsonInnov8

Voxy raises another $2.8 million – expands to Brazil

The 360° mobile learning solution Voxy just raised another $2.8 million from its current investor ff Asset Management joined by Seavest Inc., a private investment firm with a strategic focus on education and technology, Contour Ventures, and several angel investors. This brings the total funding raised so far to $4 million ($600k seed and $600k angel funding).

In April Voxy launched one of the first location based language learning apps which provides learners with useful vocabulary for places nearby like supermarkets, banks or restaurants.

The new funding will be used to make key hires, scale product development for new platforms and push into the rapidly growing Brazilian as well as other markets in the coming months.

Voxy has attracted more than 300k English learners and has been the number one education app in nine countries this year.

If you would like to learn more about Voxy, I suggest watching the EDUKWEST interview with Paul Gollash.

edukwest 67 corey thompson naiku pic

EDUKWEST #67 with Corey Thompson of Naiku

Just before my holidays in Istanbul I had the pleasure of talking with Corey Thompson, co-founder and CEO of Naiku which translates to “teacher” in Indonesian.

Naiku empowers teachers to asses each individual student’s progress and thus teach their class more effectively by providing them with innovative technology and assessment tools.

The students also get more engaged in the actual learning process as they are able to rate their own answers given in a test by level of confidence, whether they knew the answer or simply guessed it.
Naiku wants to bring innovation to educational assessment and implement technology and mobile solutions in a meaningful, so that everyone involved will benefit from higher achievement which will eventually lead to a transformation in our traditional education system.

At the beginning, Corey and I talk about their initial motivation of founding Naiku and how new assessment can lead to transformation in the education system but the second part of the interview is hands-on and Corey demos what Naiku is able to do and how it works from both the teacher and student side.

I believe this to be a very relevant topic for anyone working in or with public education and I hope that Naiku’s success will be part of a bigger disruption going on this part of the educational system.
You can of course go beyond EDUKWEST and explore Naiku on their website Naiku.net or even sign up to test it.

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Audio only:

 

Additional Links:

Homepage: http://www.naiku.net
Naiku on Twitter: @NaikuInc
Corey Thompson Twitter: @coreythompson
Corey Thompson LinkedIn: Corey Thompson
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ipadkhanfeat

First Screenshots of the upcoming Khan Academy iPad App

John Resig, the Dean of Open Source and head of JavaScript development at Khan Academy posted three screenshots of the upcoming iPad app not on Facebook, not on Twitter but on Google+.

The screenshots which are considered as being “very alpha” show a nice and clean interface with the video in the top right, navigation on the left and the transcript underneath the video. The initial 1.0 release will feature video navigation, video viewing, interactive transcripts and offline support. Exercises will be released in the next version.

An Android version is also on the road map as well as a version for the iPhone / iPod Touch. For developers, the entire source code of the application is available on Github.

Pictures: by John Resig of Khan Academy