Tag Archives: microsoft

EDUKWEST Sunday Review

Sunday Review for the Week of April 14th 2014

In this week’s Sunday Review we learn that experience without humility is not very helpful (when it comes to leading Coursera), that you can earn a MBA without spending a single dollar for tuition, that the SAT is useless, that school children in Ireland code 3D worlds and use the Oculus Rift, that you should not listen to music when you learn and much more.

And Happy Easter from the EDUKWEST team!

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On the Ed - Alpha

On the Ed – Alpha – 005 The $1.1 billion Acquisition, More Funding for Adaptive Learning and Don’t Call it a MOOC

This week I recorded On the Ed episode 005 with my guests Alicia Chang of Play-i, Shiv Rajendran of Affectively and Richard Taylor of ed-invent.

We start this episode with startup Spritz that claims to have reinvented reading through their patent-pending speed reading technology, and I didn’t want to miss out on Alicia’s opinion and comment on it as a scientist.

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Microsoft in Education - Student Privacy

Microsoft emphasizes Student Privacy, partners with Knewton, Pearson and CK-12

During the annual Microsoft in Education Global Forum in Barcelona, the company announced some interesting partnerships alongside a keynote by Anthony Salcito, vice president, Worldwide Education at Microsoft that emphasized the value of student privacy.

“Privacy concerns are holding educators back from making the most of modern technology and preparing students to succeed in today’s workplace. At the same time, many solutions being used in the classroom are unintentionally putting student data at risk.

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ENT Audio Podcast

Students on the Streets – ENT #17 05-25-2012 (Audio)

ENT Audio Podcast

Ed News Ticker #17

Students on the Streets

  • recorded: May 25th 2012
Subscribe to ENT Subscribe to ENT Audio via RSS Subscribe to ENT Audio via iTunes
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Tech & Startups

Vatican anoints Microsoft in education software deal

The Vatican has struck a deal with Microsoft to give 43 million pupils at 200,000 Roman Catholic schools in more than 100 countries access to a broad suite of the software company’s products.
The new Social Network for Catholic Education will allow students to access a product called Office 365 for Education. Pupils will be able to use the company’s widely used workplace software, as well as teleconferencing and other tools.

Source: The Globe and Mail


K12 & Higher Ed

Student loan bills stall in Senate

The Senate on Thursday voted twice to try to keep student loan interest rates low – but got nowhere.
Senators rejected dueling Republican and Democratic plans to stop rates from doubling in July, because of partisan fighting – again – over how the $6-billion bill would be paid for.
Republicans want to divert money from a prevention fund created under the new health care law, while Democrats insist on eliminating a tax loophole for Subchapter S Corporations.
Both plans were largely expected to fail to reach the 60-vote barrier to kill a filibuster. And on Thursday, neither side was budging.

Source: Politico


Canada student protests erupt into political crisis with mass arrests

Protests that began in opposition to tuition fees in Canada have exploded into a political crisis with the mass arrest of hundreds of demonstrators amid a backlash against draconian emergency laws.
More than 500 people were arrested in a demonstration in Montreal on Wednesday night as protesters defied a controversial new law – Bill 78 – that places restrictions on the right to demonstrate. In Quebec City, police arrested 176 people under the provisions of the new law.
Demonstrators have been gathering in Montreal for just over 100 days to oppose tuition increases by the Quebec provincial government. On Tuesday, about 100 people were arrested after organisers say 300,000 people took the streets.

Source: The Guardian


Mexican students protest ‘biased’ election coverage

Thousands of university students poured into the streets of Mexico City on Wednesday for the second time in a week to protest the way the upcoming presidential election is being run and, more specifically, covered in the Mexican media.
They are especially incensed that victory by Enrique Peña Nieto on July 1 is often portrayed as a fait accompli. About 15,000 (by city officials’ count) people gathered at the controversial Pillar of Light monument (seen by many here as a government boondoggle) and marched down the iconic Reforma Boulevard.
The protesters came from a wide range of universities: public, private, leftist, rightist, Catholic. And while many were decidedly anti-Peña Nieto — made clear in their banners and signs — the protest appears to go beyond pure partisan politics and represent a broader questioning of Mexico’s status quo.

Source: LA Times


Study & Research

The More Tech-Savvy The Principal, The More iPads In The Classroom

Project Tomorrow, an education research and advocacy group, released an extensive report on technology use in U.S. schools earlier this week. The report was based on the non-profit’s annual online survey, which was completed by more than 416,000 K-12 students, parents, teachers, librarians, and administrators over the course of last year.
One of the most significant finding centers on how principals, superintendents, and other school and district administrators use technology in both their personal and professional lives.
As a group, school administrators are significantly more plugged into mobile technology than the average American.

  • 50% of school administrators owned an iPad or other tablet device compared to 10% of the general population at the time of the survey.
  • 70% of administrators owned a smartphone, significantly more than the general population, which Project Tomorrow noted as being 46% at the time of the survey.
  • Nearly a third (30%) of administrators pushed for iPads, iPodtouches, laptops and other mobile devices in the classroom.
  • Teachers that have taken an online class or used the Internet for professional development (about half of all teachers in the survey) were 22% more likely to recommend online classes and similar resources for their students.
  • Schools with tech-friendly administrators are 21% likely to be exploring or implementing BYOD programs.

Source: Cult of Mac


Bilingualism May Boost Attention, Working Memory

Northwestern University trial provides new biological evidence that dual language speakers have enhanced auditory nervous systems.
Bilingualism yields functional and structural changes in cortical regions of the brain dedicated to language processing and executive function. Dual language speakers are highly efficient in processing auditory information. “Bilinguals are natural jugglers,” says co-author Viorica Marian in a statement. “The bilingual juggles linguistic input and, it appears, automatically pays greater attention to relevant versus irrelevant sounds.”

Source: The Atlantic

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protest

Students on the Streets – ENT #17 05-25-2012

ENT - The Ed News Ticker

Subscribe to ENT Subscribe to ENT Video via RSS Subscribe to ENT Audio via RSS
Subscribe to ENT Audio via iTunes
Download Episode Download Episode Video Download Episode Audio

Tech & Startups

Vatican anoints Microsoft in education software deal

The Vatican has struck a deal with Microsoft to give 43 million pupils at 200,000 Roman Catholic schools in more than 100 countries access to a broad suite of the software company’s products.
The new Social Network for Catholic Education will allow students to access a product called Office 365 for Education. Pupils will be able to use the company’s widely used workplace software, as well as teleconferencing and other tools.

Source: The Globe and Mail


K12 & Higher Ed

Student loan bills stall in Senate

The Senate on Thursday voted twice to try to keep student loan interest rates low – but got nowhere.
Senators rejected dueling Republican and Democratic plans to stop rates from doubling in July, because of partisan fighting – again – over how the $6-billion bill would be paid for.
Republicans want to divert money from a prevention fund created under the new health care law, while Democrats insist on eliminating a tax loophole for Subchapter S Corporations.
Both plans were largely expected to fail to reach the 60-vote barrier to kill a filibuster. And on Thursday, neither side was budging.

Source: Politico


Canada student protests erupt into political crisis with mass arrests

Protests that began in opposition to tuition fees in Canada have exploded into a political crisis with the mass arrest of hundreds of demonstrators amid a backlash against draconian emergency laws.
More than 500 people were arrested in a demonstration in Montreal on Wednesday night as protesters defied a controversial new law – Bill 78 – that places restrictions on the right to demonstrate. In Quebec City, police arrested 176 people under the provisions of the new law.
Demonstrators have been gathering in Montreal for just over 100 days to oppose tuition increases by the Quebec provincial government. On Tuesday, about 100 people were arrested after organisers say 300,000 people took the streets.

Source: The Guardian


Mexican students protest ‘biased’ election coverage

Thousands of university students poured into the streets of Mexico City on Wednesday for the second time in a week to protest the way the upcoming presidential election is being run and, more specifically, covered in the Mexican media.
They are especially incensed that victory by Enrique Peña Nieto on July 1 is often portrayed as a fait accompli. About 15,000 (by city officials’ count) people gathered at the controversial Pillar of Light monument (seen by many here as a government boondoggle) and marched down the iconic Reforma Boulevard.
The protesters came from a wide range of universities: public, private, leftist, rightist, Catholic. And while many were decidedly anti-Peña Nieto — made clear in their banners and signs — the protest appears to go beyond pure partisan politics and represent a broader questioning of Mexico’s status quo.

Source: LA Times


Study & Research

The More Tech-Savvy The Principal, The More iPads In The Classroom

Project Tomorrow, an education research and advocacy group, released an extensive report on technology use in U.S. schools earlier this week. The report was based on the non-profit’s annual online survey, which was completed by more than 416,000 K-12 students, parents, teachers, librarians, and administrators over the course of last year.
One of the most significant finding centers on how principals, superintendents, and other school and district administrators use technology in both their personal and professional lives.
As a group, school administrators are significantly more plugged into mobile technology than the average American.

  • 50% of school administrators owned an iPad or other tablet device compared to 10% of the general population at the time of the survey.
  • 70% of administrators owned a smartphone, significantly more than the general population, which Project Tomorrow noted as being 46% at the time of the survey.
  • Nearly a third (30%) of administrators pushed for iPads, iPodtouches, laptops and other mobile devices in the classroom.
  • Teachers that have taken an online class or used the Internet for professional development (about half of all teachers in the survey) were 22% more likely to recommend online classes and similar resources for their students.
  • Schools with tech-friendly administrators are 21% likely to be exploring or implementing BYOD programs.

Source: Cult of Mac


Bilingualism May Boost Attention, Working Memory

Northwestern University trial provides new biological evidence that dual language speakers have enhanced auditory nervous systems.
Bilingualism yields functional and structural changes in cortical regions of the brain dedicated to language processing and executive function. Dual language speakers are highly efficient in processing auditory information. “Bilinguals are natural jugglers,” says co-author Viorica Marian in a statement. “The bilingual juggles linguistic input and, it appears, automatically pays greater attention to relevant versus irrelevant sounds.”

Source: The Atlantic

Picture by kevinrosseel

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ENT Audio Podcast

Word Pool of a 10th Grader? Go into Politics! – ENT #15 05-21-2012 (Audio)

ENT Audio Podcast

Ed News Ticker #15

Word Pool of a 10th Grader? Go into Politics!

  • recorded: May 21st 2012
Subscribe to ENT Subscribe to ENT Audio via RSS Subscribe to ENT Audio via iTunes
Podnova Player button Miro Video Player
Download Episode Download Episode Audio

Tech & Startups

AT&T’s Largest Donation Ever Creates A National Hub For Learning Through Video Games

“We decided we were going to aim for exponential change in education,” explains Beth Shiroshi, AT&T Foundation’s vice president for sustainability and philanthropy. With this reboot of its Aspire education initiative launched four years ago, AT&T has made a big bet on GameDesk, a nonprofit startup that grew out of the University of Southern California. They’re committing $3.8 million for GameDesk first to build a brick-and-mortar hub in Los Angeles, a “classroom of the future” where new, game-based curricula and processes can be demonstrated, observed, and evaluated. Then the company will broadcast that data through an online educational content portal for parents, students, and educators.

Source: FastCo Exist


Microsoft Announces Its Back-To-School Promotion: Buy A PC, Get A Free Xbox

Microsoft, just like Apple, usually runs a major back-to-school promotion every summer that is meant to give students (and their parents) some extra incentives to buy a new computer. The company’s just-announced back-to-school deal for the U.S. and Canada is pretty much the same as last year’s. A year ago, Microsoft gave students who bought a new PC and Xbox 360 and this year it’s doing exactly the same.
The program is scheduled to start on May 20 in the U.S and May 18 in Canada. To be eligible, students need to buy a Windows PC worth at least $699 ($599 in Canada).

Source: TechCrunch


PC in Your Pocket: $74 Android Stick Goes on Sale

The MK802 “Android 4.0 Mini PC” just popped up at online retailer AliExpress. It has a single-core 1.5 GHz processor, 512 MB of RAM and a 3D graphics processor, and as the name suggests, it runs Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich.
To use this little guy, you’ll need a monitor or HDTV that accepts HDMI input, plus an HDMI cable. You’ll also need a wireless USB keyboard and mouse combo, which would plug into the machine’s lone USB port. The device has 4 GB of storage on board, plus a microSD card slot and it supports 802.11 b/g Wi-Fi.

Source: Time


Microsoft Launches So.Cl Network

The social website was tested by a handful of students at select universities since late last year. The site combines search and sharing for research purposes and the interface is similar to Pinterest in that users can create boards. Like the early days of Facebook, the network is only for college students right now.
Pronounced “social,” the site was developed by Microsoft’s FUSE Labs to encourage collaboration and enhance social search for learning purposes. “We expect students to continue using products such as Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and other existing social networks, as well as Bing, Google and other search tools,” So.Cl noted in its “About” section. “We hope to encourage students to reimagine how our everyday communication and learning tools can be improved, by researching, learning and sharing in their everyday lives.”

Source: Mashable


K12 & Higher Ed

When the school is the bully

Last fall a 13-year-old student was forced by her suburban Chicago school to let them access her Facebook account and scour her private information, a policy the mother says is commonplace in the Geneva Middle School South. The vice principal called the mother to demand her come to the school immediately to read through her daughter’s private messages.
Her daughter ended up crying through most of the rest of the day and therefore missed most of her classes. She was embarrassed and very upset. When confronting the school about the issue, they told her it was routine policy to investigate students’ social networking pages and cellphones.
Geneva schools superintendent Kent Mutchler told MSNBC Friday that the mother’s version of events is inaccurate, stating, “We would never demand someone’s password. When you have someone’s password, you open yourself up to other issues.” But alarmingly, he added, “If we have a disruptive situation, a school [official] will ask to see the page, and if the student refuses, we call the parents … There are different levels of concern. If there is a drug trafficking suspicion, we’ll get the police involved. If it’s something like cyberbullying, we’ll say, ‘This has been reported to us,’ and ask to see the page. We ask, ‘Is there something you want to show us?’ that sort of thing. And they volunteer.”

Source: Salon


Quebec rocked by student protests

Quebec’s provincial government, facing the most sustained student protests in Canadian history, has introduced emergency legislation that would shut some universities and impose harsh fines on pickets blocking students from attending classes, as it looks to end three months of demonstrations against rises in tuition fees.
Hundreds of demonstrators gathered in downtown Montreal on Thursday night as the government introduced the bill, with protests spilling over onto an expressway between stalled cars. Tuesday will mark 100 days since the demonstrations began.
Authorities said 122 people were arrested on Wednesday as thousands of demonstrators took to the streets of Montreal. Bank windows were smashed and missiles thrown at police.

Source: The Guardian


Study & Research

Sophomoric? Members Of Congress Talk Like 10th-Graders, Analysis Shows

It turns out that the sophistication of congressional speech-making is on the decline, according to the open government group the Sunlight Foundation. Since 2005, the average grade level at which members of Congress speak has fallen by almost a full grade.
Every word members of Congress say on the floor of the House or Senate is documented in the Congressional Record. The Sunlight Foundation took the entire Congressional Record dating back to the 1990s and plugged it into a searchable database.
Lee Drutman, a political scientist at Sunlight, took all those speeches and ran them through an algorithm to determine the grade level of congressional discourse.
“We just kind of did it for fun, and I was kind of shocked when I plotted that data and I saw that, oh my God, there’s been a real drop-off in the last several years,” he says.
In 2005, Congress spoke at an 11.5 grade level on the Flesch-Kincaid scale. Now, it’s 10.6. In other words, Congress dropped from talking like juniors to talking like sophomores.

Source: NPR

Play
ENT #15

Word Pool of a 10th Grader? Go into Politics! – ENT #15 05-21-2012

ENT - The Ed News Ticker

Subscribe to ENT Subscribe to ENT Video via RSS Subscribe to ENT Audio via RSS
Subscribe to ENT Audio via iTunes
Download Episode Download Episode Video Download Episode Audio

Tech & Startups

AT&T’s Largest Donation Ever Creates A National Hub For Learning Through Video Games

“We decided we were going to aim for exponential change in education,” explains Beth Shiroshi, AT&T Foundation’s vice president for sustainability and philanthropy. With this reboot of its Aspire education initiative launched four years ago, AT&T has made a big bet on GameDesk, a nonprofit startup that grew out of the University of Southern California. They’re committing $3.8 million for GameDesk first to build a brick-and-mortar hub in Los Angeles, a “classroom of the future” where new, game-based curricula and processes can be demonstrated, observed, and evaluated. Then the company will broadcast that data through an online educational content portal for parents, students, and educators.

Source: FastCo Exist


Microsoft Announces Its Back-To-School Promotion: Buy A PC, Get A Free Xbox

Microsoft, just like Apple, usually runs a major back-to-school promotion every summer that is meant to give students (and their parents) some extra incentives to buy a new computer. The company’s just-announced back-to-school deal for the U.S. and Canada is pretty much the same as last year’s. A year ago, Microsoft gave students who bought a new PC and Xbox 360 and this year it’s doing exactly the same.
The program is scheduled to start on May 20 in the U.S and May 18 in Canada. To be eligible, students need to buy a Windows PC worth at least $699 ($599 in Canada).

Source: TechCrunch


PC in Your Pocket: $74 Android Stick Goes on Sale

The MK802 “Android 4.0 Mini PC” just popped up at online retailer AliExpress. It has a single-core 1.5 GHz processor, 512 MB of RAM and a 3D graphics processor, and as the name suggests, it runs Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich.
To use this little guy, you’ll need a monitor or HDTV that accepts HDMI input, plus an HDMI cable. You’ll also need a wireless USB keyboard and mouse combo, which would plug into the machine’s lone USB port. The device has 4 GB of storage on board, plus a microSD card slot and it supports 802.11 b/g Wi-Fi.

Source: Time


Microsoft Launches So.Cl Network

The social website was tested by a handful of students at select universities since late last year. The site combines search and sharing for research purposes and the interface is similar to Pinterest in that users can create boards. Like the early days of Facebook, the network is only for college students right now.
Pronounced “social,” the site was developed by Microsoft’s FUSE Labs to encourage collaboration and enhance social search for learning purposes. “We expect students to continue using products such as Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and other existing social networks, as well as Bing, Google and other search tools,” So.Cl noted in its “About” section. “We hope to encourage students to reimagine how our everyday communication and learning tools can be improved, by researching, learning and sharing in their everyday lives.”

Source: Mashable


K12 & Higher Ed

When the school is the bully

Last fall a 13-year-old student was forced by her suburban Chicago school to let them access her Facebook account and scour her private information, a policy the mother says is commonplace in the Geneva Middle School South. The vice principal called the mother to demand her come to the school immediately to read through her daughter’s private messages.
Her daughter ended up crying through most of the rest of the day and therefore missed most of her classes. She was embarrassed and very upset. When confronting the school about the issue, they told her it was routine policy to investigate students’ social networking pages and cellphones.
Geneva schools superintendent Kent Mutchler told MSNBC Friday that the mother’s version of events is inaccurate, stating, “We would never demand someone’s password. When you have someone’s password, you open yourself up to other issues.” But alarmingly, he added, “If we have a disruptive situation, a school [official] will ask to see the page, and if the student refuses, we call the parents … There are different levels of concern. If there is a drug trafficking suspicion, we’ll get the police involved. If it’s something like cyberbullying, we’ll say, ‘This has been reported to us,’ and ask to see the page. We ask, ‘Is there something you want to show us?’ that sort of thing. And they volunteer.”

Source: Salon


Quebec rocked by student protests

Quebec’s provincial government, facing the most sustained student protests in Canadian history, has introduced emergency legislation that would shut some universities and impose harsh fines on pickets blocking students from attending classes, as it looks to end three months of demonstrations against rises in tuition fees.
Hundreds of demonstrators gathered in downtown Montreal on Thursday night as the government introduced the bill, with protests spilling over onto an expressway between stalled cars. Tuesday will mark 100 days since the demonstrations began.
Authorities said 122 people were arrested on Wednesday as thousands of demonstrators took to the streets of Montreal. Bank windows were smashed and missiles thrown at police.

Source: The Guardian


Study & Research

Sophomoric? Members Of Congress Talk Like 10th-Graders, Analysis Shows

It turns out that the sophistication of congressional speech-making is on the decline, according to the open government group the Sunlight Foundation. Since 2005, the average grade level at which members of Congress speak has fallen by almost a full grade.
Every word members of Congress say on the floor of the House or Senate is documented in the Congressional Record. The Sunlight Foundation took the entire Congressional Record dating back to the 1990s and plugged it into a searchable database.
Lee Drutman, a political scientist at Sunlight, took all those speeches and ran them through an algorithm to determine the grade level of congressional discourse.
“We just kind of did it for fun, and I was kind of shocked when I plotted that data and I saw that, oh my God, there’s been a real drop-off in the last several years,” he says.
In 2005, Congress spoke at an 11.5 grade level on the Flesch-Kincaid scale. Now, it’s 10.6. In other words, Congress dropped from talking like juniors to talking like sophomores.

Source: NPR

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review:ed Audio Podcast

review:ed Special #2 The Microsoft Nook Partnership (Audio)

review:ed Audio Podcast

review:ed Special Episode #2

The Microsoft Nook Partnership

  • recorded: April 30th 2012
Subscribe to review:ed Subscribe to review:ed Audio via RSS Subscribe to review:ed Audio via iTunes
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udemy This Interview is sponsored by udemyUdemy enables anyone to take and build courses online. Their goal is to disrupt and democratize education by enabling anyone to learn from the world’s experts. Visit udemy.com and follow them on Twitter @udemy.

Links

  • Microsoft and Barnes & Noble settle patent dispute; create new subsidiary
    Source: ZDNet
  • A Windows 8 e-reader: If someone builds it, will they come?
    Source: ZDNet
  • Should Barnes and Noble Break Up? Float Off the Nook To Compete With Amazon and Apple?
    Source: Forbes
  • Kindle Fire accounts for more than half of U.S. Android tablets
    Source: Computer World
  • Microsoft, Pegatron Ink Patent Deal for Android, Chrome Devices
    Source: PCMag
  • Microsoft’s $300 million Nook investment: An Android power grab?
    Source: Digital Trends
  • For Google Chairman Schmidt, Maybe Monopoly Was The Goal
    Source: Forbes
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