Tag Archives: k12

Ardusat

Ardusat enables K-12 students to remotely control small Satellites carrying Science Experiments

Ardusat, a Utah-based education company focused on enhancing student engagement through hands-on experimentation, launches a platform that will enable K-12 students to remotely control small satellites called “cubesats” carrying science experiments.

The company aims to get more kids interested in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields by letting them track storms or study solar flares from space.

It also claims that this new platform will democratize access to space for a new generation of students who won’t see NASA’s shuttle program in action.

The platform is itself available to K-12 schools during the 2014-2015 school year, with initial participants from classes in the U.S., Brazil, China, Guatemala, India, Indonesia and Israel.

Truth be told, Ardusat wants to make business with schools. Schools have to purchase the Ardusat classroom package to be able to access data from the satellites. That said, Ardusat will also produce curriculum based on its cubesat experiments that will be free for any teacher to use in the classroom.

More details in the press release

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C12 Audio Podcast

C12 Interview: Ilan Samson of QAMA Calculator (Audio)

C12 Audio Podcast

C12 Interview: Ilan Samson of QAMA Calculator

  • recorded: July 27th 2012
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Enter QAMA, truly one of the coolest, most thoughtful, welcome bits of ed tech to hit math classrooms in a very long time. Created by Ilan Samson, a retired physicist and serial inventor, to address exactly the problems I described above, the QAMA calculator forces students to provide a reasonable estimate for their answer before it will output the exact answer.

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C12 Interview Ilan Samson QAMA Calculator

C12 Interview: Ilan Samson of QAMA Calculator

Editor’s Note: The post originally appeared on ZDNet Education. Click here to read the entire post.

C12 Interview Ilan Samson QAMA Calculator

Calculators are designed to eliminate the need for repetitive, tedious arithmetic, leaving time to actually think about the math. When used correctly in the classroom, modern graphing calculators can do wonders for visualization, simulation, and encouraging that critical thought that we’re all after.

They were supposed to eliminate the tedium and simple mistakes that plague many calculations but instead have become the go-to device for any math problem. Worse, students frequently lack the mathematical savvy to know when the answer output by the calculator doesn’t make sense. Estimation, it would seem, is a lost art.

Enter QAMA, truly one of the coolest, most thoughtful, welcome bits of ed tech to hit math classrooms in a very long time. Created by Ilan Samson, a retired physicist and serial inventor, to address exactly the problems I described above, the QAMA calculator forces students to provide a reasonable estimate for their answer before it will output the exact answer.

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Ilan covered much more complex functionality later in our interview (I’m afraid that when you stick a couple of math geeks together, we can get a bit long-winded, so I didn’t include the entire interview here); however, the concept remains the same. Force students to demonstrate conceptual mastery and then give them the exact answer. The calculator is really quite amazing in its ability to determine appropriate degrees of allowable error and to prevent gaming of the system through any sort of trial and error. In fact, the logic built into the little machine would make one heck of a case study in a computer science class.

The calculator also allows for the estimating requirement to be turned off, but not with out a set of randomly flashing LEDs alerting instructors that students aren’t stepping through the full process in determining their answers. It isn’t often that a device will make me really say “Wow – this could be a game-changer.” The QAMA calculator, though, is precisely that. At around $20 a piece, these little devices are quite inexpensive and yet stand to change the way a couple generations of students have been using calculators. The ability to simply estimate is so critical in not just mathematics, but in all applications of math; the QAMA calculator is a no-brainer place to start in shifting the way our students learn math, logic, reasoning, and more.

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C12 Audio Podcast

C12 Episode 2 Homework, Homework, Homework (Audio)

C12 Audio Podcast

C12 Episode #2

“Homework, Homework, Homework”

  • recorded: March 30th 2012
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AcademicPub - Your Book Your Way This Interview is sponsored by AcademicPub – Your Book Your Way
AcademicPub allows you to take content from their copyright cleared library of over 125 publishers, your files or anything on the web, and create custom course packs that are perfect, for you.
Visit them today at academicpub.com and follow @AcademicPub on Twitter.

K12 News

Links

  • Economic recovery skips the classroom
    Source: CNNMoney
  • French parents to boycott homework
    Source: The Guardian
  • Two hours’ homework a night linked to better school results
    Source: The Guardian
  • Moodlerooms CEO: Blackboard acquisition will expand open-source movement
    Source: eSchool News
  • School district, ACLU reach settlement in filtering lawsuit
    Source: eSchool News
  • `Bully’ Documentary Rating: What Happens in Schools Is Too Much for the Multiplex
    Source: The Educated Reporter

Interview

Links


Blog of the Week

Links

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C12 with Christopher Dawson - EDUKWEST

C12 Episode 2 Homework, Homework, Homework

C12 with Christopher Dawson - EDUKWEST

In this second episode C12 Christopher Dawson invited Vince Leung, co-founder of MentorMob to talk about their learning playlists.

The blog of the week features two articles, one by Steve Wheeler about the flipped classroom and the other one by Shelly Blake-Plock on TeachPaperless about the EdTech Link in Baltimore.

Chris also covers the news in K12 including budget cuts, French parents boycotting homework, homework being linked to better school results, Moodlerooms acquisition by Blackboard and the slippery slope of community standards and local rights in the weekly K12 news round-up.

Full Episode

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AcademicPub - Your Book Your Way This Interview is sponsored by AcademicPub – Your Book Your Way
AcademicPub allows you to take content from their copyright cleared library of over 125 publishers, your files or anything on the web, and create custom course packs that are perfect, for you.
Visit them today at academicpub.com and follow @AcademicPub on Twitter.

K12 News

Links

  • Economic recovery skips the classroom
    Source: CNNMoney
  • French parents to boycott homework
    Source: The Guardian
  • Two hours’ homework a night linked to better school results
    Source: The Guardian
  • Moodlerooms CEO: Blackboard acquisition will expand open-source movement
    Source: eSchool News
  • School district, ACLU reach settlement in filtering lawsuit
    Source: eSchool News
  • `Bully’ Documentary Rating: What Happens in Schools Is Too Much for the Multiplex
    Source: The Educated Reporter

Interview

Links

Blog of the Week

Links

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m1 edukwest marker 75 tim brady imagine k12

Tim Brady explains Why Freemium is an Opportunity for Education Startups in K12

Transcript:

That’s one of the opportunities. That’s one of the things that’s changed. So teachers for the most part are … there is a lot of inefficiencies in their day, so saving them time is something they want, right. You hear these horror stories of teachers staying up all night to do a lesson plan and some soemthing like BetterLesson comes along and helps them save time. Of course they gonna want to adopt something like that. That’s just one example, I think there are hundreds of examples out there.

So by offering that and offering that for free, because again teachers really don’t have purchasing power. But they want to save time and everyone moving into the profession are almost by definition tech-savvy, so are fine at going online, downloading something and using that to their benefit. And once there are enough teachers in the school or in the district, the up-sell becomes easier.

And even the superintendents we talked to are being very excited about that because they usually say:” I sit and I listen to these sales pitches and try to imagine what the teachers want and then I have to go and convince the teachers to use it and push it down.” Superintendants are very excited when a bunch of teachers say:” Hey, we are all using this product. Can you buy this additional feature?” It actually makes it easier for the superintendent as well.

It’s an opportunity, it is certainly not the only business model out there but it’s something that has changed with the ubiquity of connectivity.

Tim Brady imagine K12
Tim Brady

 

Watch the entire interview: EDUKWEST #75 with Tim Brady of imagine K12

edukwest 67 corey thompson naiku pic

EDUKWEST #67 with Corey Thompson of Naiku

Just before my holidays in Istanbul I had the pleasure of talking with Corey Thompson, co-founder and CEO of Naiku which translates to “teacher” in Indonesian.

Naiku empowers teachers to asses each individual student’s progress and thus teach their class more effectively by providing them with innovative technology and assessment tools.

The students also get more engaged in the actual learning process as they are able to rate their own answers given in a test by level of confidence, whether they knew the answer or simply guessed it.
Naiku wants to bring innovation to educational assessment and implement technology and mobile solutions in a meaningful, so that everyone involved will benefit from higher achievement which will eventually lead to a transformation in our traditional education system.

At the beginning, Corey and I talk about their initial motivation of founding Naiku and how new assessment can lead to transformation in the education system but the second part of the interview is hands-on and Corey demos what Naiku is able to do and how it works from both the teacher and student side.

I believe this to be a very relevant topic for anyone working in or with public education and I hope that Naiku’s success will be part of a bigger disruption going on this part of the educational system.
You can of course go beyond EDUKWEST and explore Naiku on their website Naiku.net or even sign up to test it.

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Additional Links:

Homepage: http://www.naiku.net
Naiku on Twitter: @NaikuInc
Corey Thompson Twitter: @coreythompson
Corey Thompson LinkedIn: Corey Thompson
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edukwest 65 gautam rao castle rock research pic

EDUKWEST #65 with Gautam Rao of Castle Rock Research Corporation

For this EDUKWEST I sat down, virtually at least, with Gautam Rao the President and CEO of Canadian based Castle Rock Research Corporation to talk about their latest product for the iPad called Motuto.

At the beginning of our interview Gautam gives us the bigger vision on the company’s “solaro” project and what he wants to change in education. I feel, that you’ll get a good idea of where Motuto fits in and has its place and I will certainly catch up with Gautam in the coming weeks to learn more about solaro.

Motuto itself is an application for the iPhone and iPad which allows students to connect instantly to a live tutor when they are stuck with their Math or Science homework.

The tutors communicate with their students via text chat, students can use the iPad camera to take a picture of their particular problem directly from the book or working sheet and upload it to the app. The tutors are trained professionals in India and their aim is to guide the students towards the solution without simply giving it to them, so there is a really decent educational philosophy and methodolgy standing behind the product. Of course, both teacher and student can make use of the whiteboard to draw on it.

Tuition is currently available for grades 7 to 12 at the very affordable price of $4.99 for 20 min and the team believes that the average Math homework problem should be solved within this time. If the problem is more complex, each extra 20 min cost only $1.99. The app itself can be downloaded for free in the iTunes App Store.

What I like is the smart way of making use of the iPad and its different features like the camera to take snapshots. And as students learn more and more with asynchronous sources but not every problem might get solved by watching a video or doing an online exercise on their own, Motuto is sort of a guarantee that students have access to a teacher when they are in need of one.

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Additional Links:

Homepage: http://www.castlerockresearch.com
Motuto Homepage: http://www.motuto.com
Motuto on Twitter: @Motuto
Motuto iTunes: Download Motuto
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edukwest 62 rafael corrales learnboost pic

EDUKWEST #62 with Rafael Corrales of LearnBoost

This new episode of EDUKWEST will once again be very interesting for the part of my audience who are actively teaching and thus have to manage students and classes and who feel that they might want to share some of the information with the parents, too.

LearnBoost allows you to do just all of the above and is still distinct from its well established competitors! I had the pleasure of interviewing their founder and CEO Rafael Corrales on how came up with the initial idea and how he and his team have shaped it until it became what we see today: a nicely made gradebook with pretty design, easy to create & mangage lesson plans, functions to share student progress with the parents and the possibility to integrate with Google Apps.

LearnBoost is currently free to use and I hope you’ll get a good idea of LearnBoost’s capabilities watching our EDUKWEST but essentially you have nothing to lose, so I’d say anyone interested should definitely go and open an account!

The LearnBoost website is very informative and provides you with some great video tutorials as well as a regularly updated blog. However, if you happen to be in Philadelphia or have the possibility to attend ISTE 2011 LearnBoost will organize a big party around the event (June 26-29). I’d say that’s an ideal occasion to meet and get in touch with the team and to learn more about this nice solution for K-12 teaching & learning and to ask them all your remaining questions. For tickets to the party you can either contact me or LearnBoost directly!

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Additional Links:

Homepage: http://www.learnboost.com
LearnBoost on Twitter: @LearnBoost
Rafael Corrales on LinkedIn: Rafael Corrales
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