Tag Archives: k12

Meet Education Project Jessie Arora Teacher Square

MEP #008 with Jessie Arora from Teacher Square

In this episode of Meet Education Project, Jessie Arora talks about new education technology companies, Teacher Square, and building a link between teachers and ed tech products.  Don’t miss it!

Continue reading

Ardusat

Ardusat enables K-12 students to remotely control small Satellites carrying Science Experiments

Ardusat, a Utah-based education company focused on enhancing student engagement through hands-on experimentation, launches a platform that will enable K-12 students to remotely control small satellites called “cubesats” carrying science experiments.

The company aims to get more kids interested in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields by letting them track storms or study solar flares from space.

It also claims that this new platform will democratize access to space for a new generation of students who won’t see NASA’s shuttle program in action.

The platform is itself available to K-12 schools during the 2014-2015 school year, with initial participants from classes in the U.S., Brazil, China, Guatemala, India, Indonesia and Israel.

Truth be told, Ardusat wants to make business with schools. Schools have to purchase the Ardusat classroom package to be able to access data from the satellites. That said, Ardusat will also produce curriculum based on its cubesat experiments that will be free for any teacher to use in the classroom.

More details in the press release

Continue reading

edX GEMS Education

HEDLINE: edX partners with GEMS Education for K-12 MOOCs

Private school chain GEMS Education announced a partnership with edX at the Global Education and Skills Forum to bring MOOCs to the K-12 space.

GEMS Education will be edX’s first partner in K-12 and joins as contributing member. The first courses will go live in the second half of 2014.

Continue reading

C12 Audio Podcast

C12 Interview: Ilan Samson of QAMA Calculator (Audio)

C12 Audio Podcast

C12 Interview: Ilan Samson of QAMA Calculator

  • recorded: July 27th 2012
Subscribe to C12 Subscribe to C12 Audio via RSS Subscribe to review:ed Audio via iTunes
Podnova Player button Miro Video Player
Download Episode Download Episode Audio

Enter QAMA, truly one of the coolest, most thoughtful, welcome bits of ed tech to hit math classrooms in a very long time. Created by Ilan Samson, a retired physicist and serial inventor, to address exactly the problems I described above, the QAMA calculator forces students to provide a reasonable estimate for their answer before it will output the exact answer.

Play
C12 Interview Ilan Samson QAMA Calculator

C12 Interview: Ilan Samson of QAMA Calculator

Editor’s Note: The post originally appeared on ZDNet Education. Click here to read the entire post.

C12 Interview Ilan Samson QAMA Calculator

Calculators are designed to eliminate the need for repetitive, tedious arithmetic, leaving time to actually think about the math. When used correctly in the classroom, modern graphing calculators can do wonders for visualization, simulation, and encouraging that critical thought that we’re all after.

They were supposed to eliminate the tedium and simple mistakes that plague many calculations but instead have become the go-to device for any math problem. Worse, students frequently lack the mathematical savvy to know when the answer output by the calculator doesn’t make sense. Estimation, it would seem, is a lost art.

Enter QAMA, truly one of the coolest, most thoughtful, welcome bits of ed tech to hit math classrooms in a very long time. Created by Ilan Samson, a retired physicist and serial inventor, to address exactly the problems I described above, the QAMA calculator forces students to provide a reasonable estimate for their answer before it will output the exact answer.

Subscribe to C12 Subscribe to C12 Video via RSS
Subscribe to C12 Video via iTunes
Subscribe to C12 Audio via RSS
Subscribe to C12 Audio via iTunes
Download Episode Download Episode Video Download Episode Audio

Ilan covered much more complex functionality later in our interview (I’m afraid that when you stick a couple of math geeks together, we can get a bit long-winded, so I didn’t include the entire interview here); however, the concept remains the same. Force students to demonstrate conceptual mastery and then give them the exact answer. The calculator is really quite amazing in its ability to determine appropriate degrees of allowable error and to prevent gaming of the system through any sort of trial and error. In fact, the logic built into the little machine would make one heck of a case study in a computer science class.

The calculator also allows for the estimating requirement to be turned off, but not with out a set of randomly flashing LEDs alerting instructors that students aren’t stepping through the full process in determining their answers. It isn’t often that a device will make me really say “Wow – this could be a game-changer.” The QAMA calculator, though, is precisely that. At around $20 a piece, these little devices are quite inexpensive and yet stand to change the way a couple generations of students have been using calculators. The ability to simply estimate is so critical in not just mathematics, but in all applications of math; the QAMA calculator is a no-brainer place to start in shifting the way our students learn math, logic, reasoning, and more.

PlayPlay